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The one small thing people in each digital job role could do in 2019 to improve accessibility – Digital Accessibility Experts Podcast 4

At Hassell Inclusion we believe that each member of a digital development team has a role to play in ensuring that the products they create are accessible. However, often people don’t understand the accessibility requirements that they need to deliver in their role. While it’s not that difficult for designers, developers, content authors and testers to find specific accessibility requirements for their work in WCAG, it’s much harder for a governance manager, test strategy manager or social media manager to find out how accessibility plays into what they do. We may be a couple of months into 2019 now, but New Years’ Resolutions are still on our minds. So for this podcast, we sat down as a team to discuss one small thing people in each role could change or add into their work to really make a difference to the accessibility of the products that they work on. Small changes in what you do can make big changes to the accessibility of your products. Check it out here…

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What I wish I’d known when I got into accessibility – Digital Accessibility Experts Podcast Episode 1

We often meet people who are desperate to gain knowledge in accessibility. In our team at Hassell Inclusion we’re lucky to have international experts who have over 70 years of accessibility experience between us. We’ve created accessibility standards and help a diverse range of clients to apply those standards to their work every day of the week. We wanted to start opening up some of that well of experience, so people who want to know more about accessibility can benefit. That’s why we’ve created the Digital Accessibility Experts Podcast. Here’s episode 1…

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Relearnability – how to keep your disabled users through a website redesign

Despite our aversion to change, new versions of websites and apps are being released at an increasing rate. Product Managers do this to add new functionality, restructure creaking information hierarchies, or just to keep up with current design trends. However, whenever you change a digital product there will be a period in which your users will feel uncomfortable, as they have to re-learn how to use it. Even if the new site is more accessible than the previous one, if it’s structured differently you can actually lose disabled users, as the challenge of re-learning how to use a site can be a big challenge. So how can you prevent this?

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Web Accessibility Myths 2011 part 2

Part Two of my popular accessibility myths blog clears out more false assumptions for the start of 2012.
Being demolished this time: Accessibility and inclusive design are anti-creative; Accessibility and inclusive design help everyone; Disabled people use assistive technologies; Accessibility’s just about blind people – now for platforms; Text is more accessible than other media; The most important accessibility requirement for images is alt-text; The most important people in accessibility are developers; It doesn’t matter if your mobile site/app isn’t accessible, just as long as the desktop version is; Websites have to be accessible from the start; and BS8878 is just for huge companies…

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