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The one small thing people in each digital job role could do in 2019 to improve accessibility – Digital Accessibility Experts Podcast 4

At Hassell Inclusion we believe that each member of a digital development team has a role to play in ensuring that the products they create are accessible. However, often people don’t understand the accessibility requirements that they need to deliver in their role. While it’s not that difficult for designers, developers, content authors and testers to find specific accessibility requirements for their work in WCAG, it’s much harder for a governance manager, test strategy manager or social media manager to find out how accessibility plays into what they do. We may be a couple of months into 2019 now, but New Years’ Resolutions are still on our minds. So for this podcast, we sat down as a team to discuss one small thing people in each role could change or add into their work to really make a difference to the accessibility of the products that they work on. Small changes in what you do can make big changes to the accessibility of your products. Check it out here…

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Is input type=”date” ready for use in accessible websites?

One of the ‘new’ HTML5 elements – input type=”date” – was intended to simplify the collection of dates on websites, and to reduce user errors whilst doing so. So is it well supported? And does using it help make forms more accessible? We took date inputs for a test drive with different browsers and assistive technologies to see how usable the control is now. Here are the results…

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Everybody Technology – innovation through inclusive design

From the typewriter to ‘Zombies, Run!’, some of the greatest mainstream products were originally created in response to the needs of a disabled person. And many companies are finding that innovation can spring from considering how disabled people might use their products. Those were my messages last Friday when I spoke alongside IBM, Panasonic, Ribot, the BBC and AbilityNet at an event staged by the Royal London Society for Blind People, advocating ‘Everybody Technology’ – mainstream technology that can meet the needs of 100% of the population. Find out more…

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Web Accessibility Myths 2011 part 2

Part Two of my popular accessibility myths blog clears out more false assumptions for the start of 2012.
Being demolished this time: Accessibility and inclusive design are anti-creative; Accessibility and inclusive design help everyone; Disabled people use assistive technologies; Accessibility’s just about blind people – now for platforms; Text is more accessible than other media; The most important accessibility requirement for images is alt-text; The most important people in accessibility are developers; It doesn’t matter if your mobile site/app isn’t accessible, just as long as the desktop version is; Websites have to be accessible from the start; and BS8878 is just for huge companies…

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Web accessibility myths 2011 – a call for accessibility advocates to be more business-minded

It’s the time of year when web accessibility advocates tend to produce accessibility myths blogs. As nothing stays still on the web, and many of these blogs are rather old, it’s important that our understanding of accessibility myths moves on to.
So, here’s Part One of some accessibility myths I’d like to expose to clear out the cobwebs before 2012. My aim is to challenge some of the accepted assumptions many accessibility advocates hold which I believe are really not serving us, or the disabled and elderly people we are trying to help, well at all.
Being demolished this time: What disabled and elderly people need is accessibility; What website creators need is WCAG 2.0; The best business case for accessibility is the Law; Accessibility is cheap… no, it’s expensive… no, it’s cheap…; We won’t get enough Return on Investment; and If you build it (to be accessible) then they’ll come…

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BS8878’s one year anniversary – the UK web community assess its achievements

To really know if a website is accessible you need to user-test it with its disabled and elderly audiences. That’s one of the key recommendations of British Standard BS8878 which aims to increase understanding of the importance of accessibility and best practice ways of how to ensure it across digital web production for an audience of non-technical website and app creators. To really know if BS8878 is being effective in communicating those messages you need to user-test it with website creators and others in the web production community. So, to mark BS8878’s one year anniversary, its lead-author, Jonathan Hassell of Hassell Inclusion, has done just that, as well as asking major voices from the UK accessibility scene to give their thoughts. And the results are in…

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Implementing BS 8878 step 2: Accessible to whom? Audiences, trade-offs and Inclusive design

Your audience are the people who will make your site successful or not. They are your most important stakeholders, and your only way of managing them is to try to understand their needs and desires and find some way of meeting them through your site. Ensuring that as many people in your primary and secondary audiences can use your website, whatever their abilities or disabilities, is a great way of maximising your customer base. But it’s not possible to create a website that includes absolutely everybody. So how do you balance that ideal with what’s practical…

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