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Figure and figcaption – extended alternate text for screen readers?

The usual way of making images accessible for people who can’t see them is to provide alternative text using the alt attribute of the element. However, in many websites, images are presented with caption text to explain to sighted users what the image is showing. This is effectively an alternative text for the image, but there’s no ‘programmatic’ linkage for screen readers to pick up. HTML5 introduced the <figure> element as a container that could be used for images, and <figcaption> for their alternative text. So could this be used as a good way of handling images with captions, for everyone?

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Collecting dates in an accessible way

There are many different ways to collect dates from users in website forms. But what’s the best way to do that in a way that’s accessible to everyone? In this post we look at a variety of methods, look at the pros and cons of each, and present our view on the best practices for collecting dates. Check it out here…

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Is input type=”date” ready for use in accessible websites?

One of the ‘new’ HTML5 elements – input type=”date” – was intended to simplify the collection of dates on websites, and to reduce user errors whilst doing so. So is it well supported? And does using it help make forms more accessible? We took date inputs for a test drive with different browsers and assistive technologies to see how usable the control is now. Here are the results…

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Accessibility myths 2019 – Digital Accessibility Experts Podcast 3

Back in 2011, I published a blog trying to change some of the things people were misunderstanding about accessibility. In this podcast our team are bringing that up to date for 2019, busting these myths: the accessibility of words doesn’t matter; Blind screen reader users use the tab key all of the time; Accessibility consultants will find exactly the same issues when reviewing the same site; the most important accessibility is done by auditors; accessibility is the most important part of any digital project; If we want to be really good at accessibility we should go for WCAG AAA; ARIA can make anything accessible. Check it out…

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Accessible accordions part 2 – using <details> and <summary>

After a comment on my previous blog post about accessible accordion patterns, I decided to do some investigation on the details and summary HTML elements. They could be the best way of doing accordions natively in browsers, but how well is the pattern supported? And will they work with assistive technologies?

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