Articles for the ‘Inclusion paradigms’ Category

Boomers are the largest generation in history – so how do you make sure they can use your website?

Our population is ageing. Boomers are the largest generation in history. They also have significant buying power. So how should you ensure that they can use your websites and mobile apps? Digital technologies, and the accessibility opportunities they offer, have a huge amount to offer to people who are ageing. So here are some insights from my interview with Andrew Arch, who led the WAI-AGE work at W3C on the link between accessibility standards and ageing. Are the needs of people with disabilities and people who are ageing the same? Do older people use screen readers? Do the colours you use on a site matter? If older people prefer tablets and smartphones to computers, what is the main thing they dislike about browsing sites on touchscreens? How do you get people to relate to disability as a personal thing, rather than a technical solution? Find out here…

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Everybody Technology – innovation through inclusive design

From the typewriter to ‘Zombies, Run!’, some of the greatest mainstream products were originally created in response to the needs of a disabled person. And many companies are finding that innovation can spring from considering how disabled people might use their products. Those were my messages last Friday when I spoke alongside IBM, Panasonic, Ribot, the BBC and AbilityNet at an event staged by the Royal London Society for Blind People, advocating ‘Everybody Technology’ – mainstream technology that can meet the needs of 100% of the population. Find out more…

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Paralympics 2012: Do you have to be ‘superhuman’ to be an inspiration?

The Paralympics are great at giving the whole world a huge dose of inspiration from disabled athletes showing what they can do – their capabilities not their disabilities. But not all disabled people are ‘Superhuman’ athletes, and it’s not only Paralympians who have amazing stories to tell about overcoming challenges. Yves Veulliet – a diversity manager from IBM – has written an amazing book telling one of these inspiring stories with humour and brevity. We loved the book so much Jonathan Hassell interviewed Yves so he could bring his key messages to you – the need for a more business-focused view of accessibility, whether the Paralympics and Olympics should be integrated to achieve real inclusion, how rehabilitation should care more for the emotional side of becoming disabled, and why being human should be enough…

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Beyond Inclusion and Reverse Inclusion: how fully engaging with the needs of disabled and elderly people can turbo-charge innovation and profitability

Two weeks ago BBC Something Special launched a great set of ‘Out and About’ web games for children with learning difficulties. This is the latest in a ‘Beyond Inclusion’ category of websites which are aimed at the particular needs and capabilities of specific disabled audiences. Going deeper into really listening and designing for the wide range of needs of disabled and elderly people can be very challenging. But innovation often follows a challenge. And innovation is the lifeblood of most successful companies. The world regularly becomes a better place for everyone when we concentrate on taking the needs of disabled and older people more seriously. Over history, there are many examples of these ‘Beyond Inclusion’ products becoming mainstream successes. And, yes, there is money to be made…

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