Articles for the ‘Hints and tips’ Category

Going from good to great in digital accessibility – Digital Accessibility Experts Podcast 7

This month on the Digital Accessibility Experts podcast we have Rob Wemyss, one of our Hassell Inclusion Accessibility Managers who helps organisations mature in accessibility, talking about going from “good to great” in accessibility – what do you do when you’re good at this stuff but you want to push it to that next level? We’ve some great insights on: making your accessibility testing efficient by getting all your team to do it early, rather than waiting for an audit just before launch; the value of moving from looking at accessibility as compliance to looking at accessibility as customer experience, how to motivate people to make that change in mindset, and some examples of what organisations have to win by doing that; the importance of getting accessibility right in procurement as well as product development; and the importance of consistency in the accessibility of all your digital products. Check it out here…

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How new accessibility standard ISO 30071-1 helps developers

There’s a new international accessibility standard out – ISO 30071-1 – about embedding accessibility in your organisation and processes. So why should developers care? Aren’t the WCAG checkpoints for developers, and the new ISO for the product/project managers? Does it give developers any solutions for tricky accessibility challenges that they may face? Like how do they get the training they need to deliver accessibility; how to choose between WCAG 2.0 and 2.1; what requirements to use if they’re doing native apps; how to select code libraries that are accessible; what browser and assistive technologies they should test with, or should they just wait for an audit? Find out here…

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Which of Drupal and WordPress is the most accessible content management system? – Digital Accessibility Experts Podcast 5

Most websites these days are created via some form of Content Management System (CMSes). There are lots of CMSes out there. So how do you choose the right one for you? One thing you could think about is how well the CMS allows you to create websites that are accessible. Graham Armfield in our team has been working to make WordPress accessible for years. And Mike Gifford, who has been leading accessibility work on Drupal, is another good friend of ours at Hassell Inclusion. So in this month’s podcast we’ve put them together to discuss their work. Check it out here…

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Figure and figcaption – extended alternate text for screen readers?

The usual way of making images accessible for people who can’t see them is to provide alternative text using the alt attribute of the element. However, in many websites, images are presented with caption text to explain to sighted users what the image is showing. This is effectively an alternative text for the image, but there’s no ‘programmatic’ linkage for screen readers to pick up. HTML5 introduced the <figure> element as a container that could be used for images, and <figcaption> for their alternative text. So could this be used as a good way of handling images with captions, for everyone?

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Collecting dates in an accessible way

There are many different ways to collect dates from users in website forms. But what’s the best way to do that in a way that’s accessible to everyone? In this post we look at a variety of methods, look at the pros and cons of each, and present our view on the best practices for collecting dates. Check it out here…

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Is input type=”date” ready for use in accessible websites?

One of the ‘new’ HTML5 elements – input type=”date” – was intended to simplify the collection of dates on websites, and to reduce user errors whilst doing so. So is it well supported? And does using it help make forms more accessible? We took date inputs for a test drive with different browsers and assistive technologies to see how usable the control is now. Here are the results…

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Accessibility myths 2019 – Digital Accessibility Experts Podcast 3

Back in 2011, I published a blog trying to change some of the things people were misunderstanding about accessibility. In this podcast our team are bringing that up to date for 2019, busting these myths: the accessibility of words doesn’t matter; Blind screen reader users use the tab key all of the time; Accessibility consultants will find exactly the same issues when reviewing the same site; the most important accessibility is done by auditors; accessibility is the most important part of any digital project; If we want to be really good at accessibility we should go for WCAG AAA; ARIA can make anything accessible. Check it out…

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Accessible accordions part 2 – using <details> and <summary>

After a comment on my previous blog post about accessible accordion patterns, I decided to do some investigation on the details and summary HTML elements. They could be the best way of doing accordions natively in browsers, but how well is the pattern supported? And will they work with assistive technologies?

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Thinking of adding festive cheer to your site? Will everyone appreciate your Christmas plugin?

Christmas is coming fast. So how does Santa relate to accessibility? The Christmasify WordPress plugin allows web sites to add a selection of Christmassy items: snowfall, Santa on his sledge moving across the screen, some Christmassy tunes playing, festive decorations for images, and a Christmassy font for the headings. A bit of seasonable fun? Yes. But adding this plugin (and others like it) can cause serious accessibility issues for significant numbers of your site visitors. So can the plugin’s accessibility (and Christmas) be saved?

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