Articles for 2012

A clear EU accessibility law proposed? At what cost?

Early this month the European Commission issued a proposal for a directive on “Accessibility of Public Sector Bodies’ Websites”. This will require twelve categories of EU public-sector websites to comply with W3C’s Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 2.0 at the AA level. The directive could establish a law centred around a clearer definition of ‘the objective set of criteria for determining what an accessible website looks like’ that many accessibility advocates have been wanting for years. So what does this proposed directive mean for developers, disabled & older people, and website owners in the UK? Is it going to get disabled and older people the benefits they want, without burdening website owners with unreasonable costs that prevent them implementing it? Find out more…

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Everybody Technology – innovation through inclusive design

From the typewriter to ‘Zombies, Run!’, some of the greatest mainstream products were originally created in response to the needs of a disabled person. And many companies are finding that innovation can spring from considering how disabled people might use their products. Those were my messages last Friday when I spoke alongside IBM, Panasonic, Ribot, the BBC and AbilityNet at an event staged by the Royal London Society for Blind People, advocating ‘Everybody Technology’ – mainstream technology that can meet the needs of 100% of the population. Find out more…

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Netflix captions lawsuit settlement – how the perception of why you’ve improved your accessibility is vital for ROI

The captions lawsuit between NAD and Netflix has now been settled, with an agreement for Netflix to achieve 100% captioned programmes within 2 years and to pay costs of $755,000 in legal fees. So what does this mean for Netflix, NAD, the hard-of-hearing people that organisations like NAD represent, and the web industry in general? What will Netflix have to do to gain the maximum return on investment for their extra captioning work? And what can all organisations learn from the case about how to portray their accessibility decisions to disabled audiences?

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Line in the sand – getting past the legacy content accessibility problem

Organisations are often embarrassed about their fragmented history of dealing with accessibility. They reckon some parts of their website (or sites) might be accessible, other parts really concern them, and yet others they haven’t got a clue about. They’re worried that they have to make everything accessible, right now. And they can’t see how to make legacy content accessible without great expense, even if it’s not really that important to them and their users any more. Find out how ‘drawing a line in the sand’ can free up organisations to move forwards with accessibility, without legacy issues holding them back…

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Paralympics 2012: paralympic legacy, inclusion and accessibility

Now the wonder of the Paralympics is over, thoughts turn to its legacy. Have the Paralympics changed the way people feel about disabled people for good? Or did all that sweat and inspiration just create a temporary summer without cynicism? In the world of web accessibility improvements are often temporary. Accessibility testing finds problems to be fixed in a product, but often no changes happen to the way products are created, so problems re-occur in the next version. Learning from your mistakes is great. But not forgetting what you’ve learnt is even better. Read how BS 8878 was designed to help organisations do this, to secure the legacy…

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Paralympics 2012: Do you have to be ‘superhuman’ to be an inspiration?

The Paralympics are great at giving the whole world a huge dose of inspiration from disabled athletes showing what they can do – their capabilities not their disabilities. But not all disabled people are ‘Superhuman’ athletes, and it’s not only Paralympians who have amazing stories to tell about overcoming challenges. Yves Veulliet – a diversity manager from IBM – has written an amazing book telling one of these inspiring stories with humour and brevity. We loved the book so much Jonathan Hassell interviewed Yves so he could bring his key messages to you – the need for a more business-focused view of accessibility, whether the Paralympics and Olympics should be integrated to achieve real inclusion, how rehabilitation should care more for the emotional side of becoming disabled, and why being human should be enough…

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NAD vs Netflix captions lawsuit: is LoveFilm in the UK even more exposed?

Last week, a U.S. federal judge allowed a lawsuit that would require Netflix to include closed captioning on all its Watch Instantly content to move forward, denying Netflix’s request for the dismissal of the case. However, possibly as a result of this lawsuit, Netflix is already doing more than almost any other video-on-demand supplier to enrich its content with captions / subtitles. So are other VOD suppliers like LoveFIlm in danger of facing similar lawsuits in the UK?

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How to write an effective Accessibility Statement

To mark the first Global Accessibility Awareness Day (GAAD), here’s a blog on how to write effective accessibility statements based on the guidance in BS 8878. Find out who the audience for statements are, the main reasons most accessibility statements don’t work, and tips for how to get it right…

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Accessibility goes mainstream: creating effective websites through BS 8878, WordPress & Website In 1 Day

There is a strong link between inclusion, user-focus and the delivery of effective websites. Industry feedback suggests BS 8878 is enabling large and small businesses to produce effective websites, rather than just accessible ones. Based on this, Hassell Inclusion and Coolfields Consulting have created Website in 1 Day – a bold new option for helping small businesses create their own effective websites in record time…

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Case studies of implementing BS 8878 – CSUN 12 presentation

Why is embedding web accessibility into your organisation’s culture and processes so important? And what do organisations who have done this using BS 8878 say are the benefits? In this presentation Jonathan Hassell, the Standard’s lead-author, answers these questions and poses one of his own: should BS 8878 become an International Standard, and if so, how?